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dcc-fheremonsters

Page history last edited by Paul Wolfe 7 years, 10 months ago

 

Monsters of Fhere

Some of the creatures that inhabit the alien world of Fhere were engineered by the Mystic Empire of the Indomitable Vril. Others evolved in the harsh conditions of the planet.

 


 

Blowfly

Init -1; Atk bite -2 melee (1d3); stinger (1); AC 13; HD 1d8; MV fly 30’; walk 20’; Act 1d20; SP: Attach, Implant eggs ;SV Fort +2,Ref +4, Will +1; AL N.
Blowflies are cat-sized flying insectoids with four long legs with suction-cupped feet. Blowflies can fly for three rounds, before landing – usually on some prey, living or dead. When a blowfly attacks, it attaches itself to its prey (STR +4). Attached, blowflies automatically hit with their bite attack each round. So attached, blowflies implant eggs under the skin of their victims with a painful stinger. Those struck by the blowfly stinger must make a Fortitude save DC 12. Unless treated, the blowfly larva eat their way out of the host dealing 1d3 damage per round for 4 rounds. A successful Heal check (DC 12) with the proper unguents and medicines kills the eggs, or the active larva in 2 rounds.

 

 

Dringas

Init +2; Atk bite -2 melee (1d3); AC 15; HD 2d6; MV 50’; Act 1d20; SP Endurance, Tracking; SV Fort +2, Ref +1, Will +2; AL N.
Typically used as mounts by the Vril, dringas are scrawny, bipedal herbivores that resemble a cross between an ostrich and a naked rat. Though fierce-looking, dringas do not often fight, though they can be trained to. Their true strength is their ability to run long distances with heavy loads, and their innate tracking ability, which comes in handy when Dhoja slavetakers are searching for runaways or new meat.

Dringas can move at their full speed for up to five days without food and water. They can carry up to 200 lbs and move up to ¾ of their speed, as above. Given a sensory clue, dringas can be trained to track prey. The senses used for this tracking are a combination of scent and psychic residue – the base bonus for tracking is +5.

The skin of a dringa can be cured into thick but light leather which can be crafted into a hide armor providing +3 AC (light armor). The base DC for crafting is 15 due to the complexities of curing and working with dringa skin. One dringa can produce one human-sized suit of hide armor, with a leather helmet.

 

Duala

Init -1; Atk weapon +1 scratch (1d2); AC 12; HD 1d6; MV 10’; Act 1d20;SP: Stunning blast; SV Fort +3,Ref -2, Will +0; AL N.

The duala is a small mobile flowering plant that inhabits the Weeping Plains and Wasted Hills. Though they move very slowly, typically the duala cluster in the branches of spider trees, use their blast abilities and then drop onto their stunned prey to feed.

The duala typically cluster in groups of 2d4. When they attack, one duala blasts (FORT DC 13 – stunned for 1d3 rounds), and the remainder of the cluster drop onto the stunned prey. They attack with their spiny roots, which sink into the victim and drain 1d3 hp of blood each round. With a successful Heal check (DC 13) the duala can be removed safely. Otherwise, removing a duala causes 1d6 damage.

Duala bear fruit three times a year. With a successful Heal or Survival check (DC 14), the fruit can be made into a kind of jelly that grants +1 to Heal checks on wounds, diseases or poisons. The fruit of one duala creates enough jelly for one application. Fruited duala occur only in the late spring. At other times a fruited duala may be encountered 20% of the time. Duala fruits are highly prized as trade goods.

 

Fele’tan

Init +3; Atk weapon +3 ranged (0); AC 12; HD 1d8; MV Float 10’, Jet 40’; Act 1d20;SP: Attach, Digest, Blindsight  SV Fort +3,Ref +1, Will +2; AL N.

The fele’tan is an insectoid creature that resembles a cilia-encrusted balloon the size of a large dog. The fele’tan generally holes up in rotting tree trunks, cracks in cliff faces or holes in the ground, hiding or waiting to pounce on their prey.


A fele’tan’s attack consists of a wad of sticky cilia (40’ line). If successful, the fele’tan’ jets toward its victim, sticking there automatically (STR +3). The next round, it regurgitates its digestive system on the victim, dealing 1d6+1 damage per round. Fele’tan can only jet for 1 round and then must wait another full round before jetting again.

Fele’tan are generally passive and avoid confrontation unless hunting for prey. If a victim breaks loose from the fele’tan’s cilia, it typically flees back to its hiding place. Fele’tan reproduce asexually; small pods continually grow on their backs, several of which are shed daily. About 20% of these pods develop into adult fele’tan in a few weeks. Fele’tan pods are considered a delicacy by arachno-men and fetch quite a price – a Fele’tan has a 50% chance of having 2d3 mature pods attached. Each comprises 1 ration for anyone that can managed to choke them down.

 

Hruthin

Init -1; Atk no active attacks; AC 17; HD 4d10; MV 30’; Act 1d20;SP: Fetid Gas, Crush, Digest  SV Fort +5,Ref -4, Will +2; AL N.

Hruthin are a species similar to the purple stone spires found on the Weeping Plains, however hruthin are mobile predators that stalk both the plains and the Wasted Hills. The size of an Earth elephant, Hruthin are formed from a flexible living mineral, and though they have no legs, they move via rapid undulations of their bellies making them incredibly fast for their size – though they cannot “run.”

Hruthin primarily hunt the bracha using a complex sensory system composed of a dim purple light (not visible to bracha) from their phosphorescent skin and a fetid chemical gas that disables bracha and any other creature caught in the cloud. Their sensory organs are attuned to the gas they emit allowing them to “see” anything within the cloud – meaning a stiff wind can make them essentially blind.

The cloud surrounds the creature at a 30’ radius and requires a Fortitude DC 14. Failure indicates the victim loses consciousness for 1d4+1 rounds. Once disabled the hruthin “flows” over its prey dealing 4d6 damage per round in weight and digestive juices. If a group of creatures including bracha are disabled, the hruthin consumes the bracha before other victims.

The outer layer of a hruthin’s skin can be harvested, though it requires a Fortitude DC 14 check, otherwise the harvester is knocked unconscious – unless precautions are taken. The mineral rich layer is notoriously difficult to work (Survival DC 18), but can be cured into an inflexible “leather” that can be cut and worked like slate.

 

Bracha

Init +4; Atk claws -2 melee (1d3); AC 12; HD 1d8; MV 50’; Act 1d20; SV Fort +1,Ref +3, Will -2; AL N.

Bracha are six-limbed long-necked herbivores that graze the low bushes and trees in the Weeping Plains and Wasted Hills. About the size of an Earth buffalo, the bracha are actually great flightless birds with four long legs clawed at the knee and foot and two smaller arms used to manipulate the willowy stems of yala bushes and uninin fern-trees.
 
Bracha are social animals grouping in flocks of up to twenty and have few defenses, other than to stampede. They are very wary and emit a low frequency squawk used primarily to communicate danger to its fellows. When an enemy is sighted, especially their primary predator, the hruthin, the creatures flee in a curious, but graceful leaping run.
 
The arachno-men of the Wasted Hills sometimes use bracha as draft animals, though they are difficult to train. Most often they are domesticated as a ready food source – a bracha can provide up to 14 days of rations if properly harvested (Survival DC 10 – 3 rations + 1 per point up to 14)

 

Tusked Cat

Init +3; Atk Tusk +2 melee (1d6+2); AC 14; HD 2d8; MV 40’; Act 1d20; SP: Leap; SV Fort +2,Ref +4, Will +1; AL N.
The tusked cat is lion-sized furred reptile with a single, thick tusk protruding from its lower jaw about four feet long. The creature uses its two powerful legs to run down its prey, though it has a third “leg” just above its belly used solely to power its amazing leap. Tusked cats are typically solitary hunters, though during the breeding season, up to five may be encountered.

As the cat closes within twenty feet of its prey, the “leg” uncoils and slams against the ground propelling it through the air up to 20’ and impaling its tusk typically in its prey’s throat. If the cat is able to leap before attacking, the tusk attack is made at +4 and it receives a +2 bonus to damage.
 
The tusked cat’s coat is a patchwork of colors, from violet to deep purple, though its head is completely bald. The cat receives a +4 check to Hide when in the Weeping Plains or the Wasted Hills. Clothing made from a horned cat’s pelt, when properly cured (Survival DC 12), grants a +2 to Hide checks made in these areas.

 

Garag

Init +2; Atk weapon +2 horns (1d8+2); bite +0 melee (1d4+1); AC 17; HD 3d8; MV 30’, Fly 20’; Act 1d20; SP: Confusion  SV Fort +4,Ref +1, Will +1; AL N.

The garag is a large insectoid similar to an armored beetle about the size and disposition of a grizzly bear. Two long and jagged horns protrude from its head, which it uses to impale its prey. Though it has six legs, its two front legs are typically used for pushing food into its chomping mandibles.

When attacking, the garage emits a piercing squeal. Those within a 20’ radius must make a Will save DC 14 or be stunned. On a natural “1,” the victim is incapacitated for 1d4 rounds.
 
The garag can fly short distances, though it only does so to escape a larger predator. Typically, it lurks on cliff faces and large trees, waiting for food to pass nearby.

 

Ghut

Init -1; Atk Claws +8 (Grapple +10 STR); Stinger +8 melee (1d10+4 + poison); AC 22; HD 12d8; MV Fly 120’, Crawl 20’; Act 1d20/1d20;SP: Poison SV Fort +0,Ref +0, Will +0; AL N.

The ghut is a massive flying insectoid similar in appearance to a wasp, though the size of a tyrannosaurus. The sound of its thrumming wings can be heard for miles (to modern humans, it sounds like a helicopter). The ghut has a four segmented body and an many hundred legs, the abdomen segment being long and thin and curved under the body and legs as it flies. Four pairs of legs are much longer than the others and are used for clutching prey.

The ghut sports a stinger the size of a longspear. It injects poison into its prey (FORT DC 18 – or paralysis and death in 1d6 turns). When attacking, it typically grapples with its claws and then stings until its prey is paralyzed – then flies back to the nest with its paralyzed prey in its claws.
 
The ghut lurks in clay lairs of its own making often attached to the sides of high cliff walls. A mated pair lives in the lair, though only one ghut hunts almost continually to feed its clutch of maggots.

 

Ugat

Init +4; Atk claws +3 melee (1d3 + pin +3 STR); +4 proboscis ( grappled only - poison); AC 15; HD 3d8; MV 45’; Act 1d20/1d16;SP: Poison; SV Fort +3,Ref +2, Will +1; AL N.

Ugats are furry bird-like creatures that resemble kiwis, however, they are the size of a tiger and rather voracious hunters and scavengers. Ugats roam the Wasted Hills hunting in packs of up to 10 and holing up in natural caves. They attack with their four-toed claws attempting to pin their victims to inject paralyzing and acidic digestive juices (FORT DC 14, paralysis for 2d4 rounds). Once the victim is paralyzed and the digestive juices liquefy the victim’s insides, the ugat sucks up the yummy brew.

 

Vril Centurions


Vril Centurions are the blunt force trauma the dimensional slavers apply to their enemies. Centurions are 'built' more than bred, though the race does breed true if given the opportunity. Called the Teshact in the Vril language, the Centurions are powerfully built humanoids that resemble a mammalian predator, such as a wolf or bear, with reptilian features (observers of Teshact from Earth would call them a humanoid wolf-crocodile). Teshact are not known for their intelligence, though they do have battle cunning (especially their officers), and are able to execute complex military strategies and tactics. Just don't ask them to solve for Y, unless Y is how to eat their enemies after reducing them to bite-sized chunks.


Teschact Regulars:  Init +4; Atk Stingsword +3 melee (1d8+2; Sting) or Stingspear +3 melee (1d6+1; Sting) or Plasma Rifle +2 ranged (1d8+1; Stun); AC 20; HD 3d10; MV 30’; Act 1d20*;SP: All-around attack*, Han’uma and Dortich weaponry;  SV Fort +6,Ref +2, Will +4; AL L.

Teshact regulars are the 'meat' of the Vril armies. They fill the standard infantry, scouts, and beast-cavalry roles. Centurions cannot be intimidated and never need check morale.

 

If a centurion does not move in a round, it may attack all adjacent foes at -1 per foe attacked. If the centurion’s attack roll exceeds the opponent’s AC by 5, Han’uma (Sting) melee weapons inject a painful toxin (Fort DC 10+damage). On a failed save, the weapon does an additional 1d6 damage. If an attack by Vril plasma weaponry (Dortich) exceeds the opponent’s AC by 5, the opponent must make a Will save (DC 10+damage) or be knocked unconscious.

Teschact Scouts:  Init +6; Atk Stingblade +3 melee (1d6+1; Sting); Plasmagun +4 ranged (1d8+1; Stun); AC 16; HD 2d10; MV 30’; Act 1d20;SP: Han’uma and Dortich weaponry; Lightning Reflexes  SV Fort +2,Ref +6, Will +2; AL L.

Centurion scouts are more intelligent forms of Teschact trained to drive and pilot the Vril ground and hover vehicles. Typically, these Teschact are lightly armed and smaller versions of their Centurion cousins. Behind the controls of Vril vehicles, the scout’s lightning reflexes provide a +6 to Agility checks to pilot.

 

Vril Overseers


Vril overseers act as military officers, technicians, slave keepers and various mundane and 'middle class' tasks in Vril society. Overseers, called Dhoja in the Vril language, are gaunt, multi-armed humanoid creatures with bulbous insectoid heads. Their legs are double-jointed allowing them to drop onto four limbs, and still use their second set of arms to manipulate tools and weapons. Dhoja are incredibly intelligent, and prolific, but also complacent, thus though they make up the bulk of Vril society, they are content to be ruled, rather than to rule.
 
Some have opined that arachno-men are biological mutations of the Dhoja, though such talk is brutally repressed in Vril society.

Dhoja Slavetaker:  Init +2; Atk Plasmalance +2 melee (1d8+1; Stun) or 2 Stingswords +2 melee (1d6+1; Sting); Plasmalance +2 ranged (1d6+1; Stun); AC 14; HD 1d10; MV 30’; Act 1d20 or 1d16/1d16;SP: Han’uma and Dortich weaponry; Fear, Telepathy; SV Fort +2,Ref +2, Will +6; AL L.

Dhoja slavetakers are the whips of the Vril society, catching and managing the slave races, typically arachno-men.

Dhoja can communicate with any semi-intelligent creature via telepathy at a range of 100 yards. They use this ability to control their mounts (typically dringas) and to communicate between themselves and their charges. Using this ability, Dhoja can cause fear in its opponents (Will DC 16). This is typically used to cow captured slaves or potential slaves.

 

Navigator

 

Planet of Fear - DCC

Episode 0.1 - The Lord's Horse
Episode 0.2 - In the Vault of the Mindhead
Monsters of Fhere

 

Blowfly:  Init -1; Atk bite -2 melee (1d3); stinger (1); AC 13; HD 1d8; MV fly 30’; walk 20’; Act 1d20; SP: Attach, Implant eggs ;SV Fort +2,Ref +4, Will +1; AL N.

 

Blowflies are cat-sized flying insectoids with four long legs with suction-cupped feet. Blowflies can fly for three rounds, before landing – usually on some prey, living or dead. When a blowfly attacks, it attaches itself to its prey (STR +4). Attached, blowflies automatically hit with their bite attack each round. So attached, blowflies implant eggs under the skin of their victims with a painful stinger. Those struck by the blowfly stinger must make a Fortitude save DC 12. Unless treated, the blowfly larva eat their way out of the host dealing 1d3 damage per round for 4 rounds. A successful Heal check (DC 12) with the proper unguents and medicines kills the eggs, or the active larva in 2 rounds.

 

Dringas:  Init +2; Atk bite -2 melee (1d3); AC 15; HD 2d6; MV 50’; Act 1d20; SP Endurance, Tracking; SV Fort +2, Ref +1, Will +2; AL N.

 

Typically used as mounts by the Vril, dringas are scrawny, bipedal herbivores that resemble a cross between an ostrich and a naked rat. Though fierce-looking, dringas do not often fight, though they can be trained to. Their true strength is their ability to run long distances with heavy loads, and their innate tracking ability, which comes in handy when Dhoja slavetakers are searching for runaways or new meat.

 

Dringas can move at their full speed for up to five days without food and water. They can carry up to 200 lbs and move up to ¾ of their speed, as above. Given a sensory clue, dringas can be trained to track prey. The senses used for this tracking are a combination of scent and psychic residue – the base bonus for tracking is +5.

 

The skin of a dringa can be cured into thick but light leather which can be crafted into a hide armor providing +3 AC (light armor). The base DC for crafting is 15 due to the complexities of curing and working with dringa skin. One dringa can produce one human-sized suit of hide armor, with a leather helmet.

 

Duala: Init -1; Atk weapon +1 scratch (1d2); AC 12; HD 1d6; MV 10’; Act 1d20;SP: Stunning blast; SV Fort +3,Ref -2, Will +0; AL N.

 

The duala is a small mobile flowering plant that inhabits the Weeping Plains and Wasted Hills. Though they move very slowly, typically the duala cluster in the branches of spider trees, use their blast abilities and then drop onto their stunned prey to feed.

 

The duala typically cluster in groups of 2d4. When they attack, one duala blasts (FORT DC 13 – stunned for 1d3 rounds), and the remainder of the cluster drop onto the stunned prey. They attack with their spiny roots, which sink into the victim and drain 1d3 hp of blood each round. With a successful Heal check (DC 13) the duala can be removed safely. Otherwise, removing a duala causes 1d6 damage.

 

Duala bear fruit three times a year. With a successful Heal or Survival check (DC 14), the fruit can be made into a kind of jelly that grants +1 to Heal checks on wounds, diseases or poisons. The fruit of one duala creates enough jelly for one application. Fruited duala occur only in the late spring. At other times a fruited duala may be encountered 20% of the time. Duala fruits are highly prized as trade goods.

 

Fele’tan:  Init +3; Atk weapon +3 ranged (0); AC 12; HD 1d8; MV Float 10’, Jet 40’; Act 1d20;SP: Attach, Digest, Blindsight  SV Fort +3,Ref +1, Will +2; AL N.

 

The fele’tan is an insectoid creature that resembles a cilia-encrusted balloon the size of a large dog. The fele’tan generally holes up in rotting tree trunks, cracks in cliff faces or holes in the ground, hiding or waiting to pounce on their prey. 

A fele’tan’s attack consists of a wad of sticky cilia (40’ line). If successful, the fele’tan’ jets toward its victim, sticking there automatically (STR +3). The next round, it regurgitates its digestive system on the victim, dealing 1d6+1 damage per round. Fele’tan can only jet for 1 round and then must wait another full round before jetting again.

 

Fele’tan are generally passive and avoid confrontation unless hunting for prey. If a victim breaks loose from the fele’tan’s cilia, it typically flees back to its hiding place. Fele’tan reproduce asexually; small pods continually grow on their backs, several of which are shed daily. About 20% of these pods develop into adult fele’tan in a few weeks. Fele’tan pods are considered a delicacy by arachno-men and fetch quite a price – a Fele’tan has a 50% chance of having 2d3 mature pods attached. Each comprises 1 ration for anyone that can managed to choke them down.

 

Hruthin:  Init -1; Atk no active attacks; AC 17; HD 4d10; MV 30’; Act 1d20;SP: Fetid Gas, Crush, Digest  SV Fort +5,Ref -4, Will +2; AL N.

 

Hruthin are a species similar to the purple stone spires found on the Weeping Plains, however hruthin are mobile predators that stalk both the plains and the Wasted Hills. The size of an Earth elephant, Hruthin are formed from a flexible living mineral, and though they have no legs, they move via rapid undulations of their bellies making them incredibly fast for their size – though they cannot “run.”

 

Hruthin primarily hunt the bracha using a complex sensory system composed of a dim purple light (not visible to bracha) from their phosphorescent skin and a fetid chemical gas that disables bracha and any other creature caught in the cloud. Their sensory organs are attuned to the gas they emit allowing them to “see” anything within the cloud – meaning a stiff wind can make them essentially blind.

 

The cloud surrounds the creature at a 30’ radius and requires a Fortitude DC 14. Failure indicates the victim loses consciousness for 1d4+1 rounds. Once disabled the hruthin “flows” over its prey dealing 4d6 damage per round in weight and digestive juices. If a group of creatures including bracha are disabled, the hruthin consumes the bracha before other victims.

 

The outer layer of a hruthin’s skin can be harvested, though it requires a Fortitude DC 14 check, otherwise the harvester is knocked unconscious – unless precautions are taken. The mineral rich layer is notoriously difficult to work (Survival DC 18), but can be cured into an inflexible “leather” that can be cut and worked like slate.

 

Bracha:  Init +4; Atk claws -2 melee (1d3); AC 12; HD 1d8; MV 50’; Act 1d20; SV Fort +1,Ref +3, Will -2; AL N.

 

Bracha are six-limbed long-necked herbivores that graze the low bushes and trees in the Weeping Plains and Wasted Hills. About the size of an Earth buffalo, the bracha are actually great flightless birds with four long legs clawed at the knee and foot and two smaller arms used to manipulate the willowy stems of yala bushes and uninin fern-trees.

 

Bracha are social animals grouping in flocks of up to twenty and have few defenses, other than to stampede. They are very wary and emit a low frequency squawk used primarily to communicate danger to its fellows. When an enemy is sighted, especially their primary predator, the hruthin, the creatures flee in a curious, but graceful leaping run.

 

The arachno-men of the Wasted Hills sometimes use bracha as draft animals, though they are difficult to train. Most often they are domesticated as a ready food source – a bracha can provide up to 14 days of rations if properly harvested (Survival DC 10 – 3 rations + 1 per point up to 14)

 

 

Tusked Cat:  Init +3; Atk Tusk +2 melee (1d6+2); AC 14; HD 2d8; MV 40’; Act 1d20; SP: Leap; SV Fort +2,Ref +4, Will +1; AL N.

The tusked cat is lion-sized furred reptile with a single, thick tusk protruding from its lower jaw about four feet long. The creature uses its two powerful legs to run down its prey, though it has a third “leg” just above its belly used solely to power its amazing leap. Tusked cats are typically solitary hunters, though during the breeding season, up to five may be encountered.

 

As the cat closes within twenty feet of its prey, the “leg” uncoils and slams against the ground propelling it through the air up to 20’ and impaling its tusk typically in its prey’s throat. If the cat is able to leap before attacking, the tusk attack is made at +4 and it receives a +2 bonus to damage.

 

The tusked cat’s coat is a patchwork of colors, from violet to deep purple, though its head is completely bald. The cat receives a +4 check to Hide when in the Weeping Plains or the Wasted Hills. Clothing made from a horned cat’s pelt, when properly cured (Survival DC 12), grants a +2 to Hide checks made in these areas.

 

Garag:  Init +2; Atk weapon +2 horns (1d8+2); bite +0 melee (1d4+1); AC 17; HD 3d8; MV 30’, Fly 20’; Act 1d20; SP: Confusion  SV Fort +4,Ref +1, Will +1; AL N.

 

The garag is a large insectoid similar to an armored beetle about the size and disposition of a grizzly bear. Two long and jagged horns protrude from its head, which it uses to impale its prey. Though it has six legs, its two front legs are typically used for pushing food into its chomping mandibles.

 

When attacking, the garage emits a piercing squeal. Those within a 20’ radius must make a Will save DC 14 or be stunned. On a natural “1,” the victim is incapacitated for 1d4 rounds.

 

The garag can fly short distances, though it only does so to escape a larger predator. Typically, it lurks on cliff faces and large trees, waiting for food to pass nearby.

 

Ghut:  Init -1; Atk Claws +8 (Grapple +10 STR); Stinger +8 melee (1d10+4 + poison); AC 22; HD 12d8; MV Fly 120’, Crawl 20’; Act 1d20/1d20;SP: Poison SV Fort +0,Ref +0, Will +0; AL N.

 

The ghut is a massive flying insectoid similar in appearance to a wasp, though the size of a tyrannosaurus. The sound of its thrumming wings can be heard for miles (to modern humans, it sounds like a helicopter). The ghut has a four segmented body and an many hundred legs, the abdomen segment being long and thin and curved under the body and legs as it flies. Four pairs of legs are much longer than the others and are used for clutching prey.

 

The ghut sports a stinger the size of a longspear. It injects poison into its prey (FORT DC 18 – or paralysis and death in 1d6 turns). When attacking, it typically grapples with its claws and then stings until its prey is paralyzed – then flies back to the nest with its paralyzed prey in its claws.

 

The ghut lurks in clay lairs of its own making often attached to the sides of high cliff walls. A mated pair lives in the lair, though only one ghut hunts almost continually to feed its clutch of maggots.

 

Ugat:  Init +4; Atk claws +3 melee (1d3 + pin +3 STR); +4 proboscis ( grappled only - poison); AC 15; HD 3d8; MV 45’; Act 1d20/1d16;SP: Poison; SV Fort +3,Ref +2, Will +1; AL N.

 

Ugats are furry bird-like creatures that resemble kiwis, however, they are the size of a tiger and rather voracious hunters and scavengers. Ugats roam the Wasted Hills hunting in packs of up to 10 and holing up in natural caves. They attack with their four-toed claws attempting to pin their victims to inject paralyzing and acidic digestive juices (FORT DC 14, paralysis for 2d4 rounds). Once the victim is paralyzed and the digestive juices liquefy the victim’s insides, the ugat sucks up the yummy brew.

 

Vril Centurions

Vril Centurions are the blunt force trauma the dimensional slavers apply to their enemies. Centurions are 'built' more than bred, though the race does breed true if given the opportunity. Called the Teshact in the Vril language, the Centurions are powerfully built humanoids that resemble a mammalian predator, such as a wolf or bear, with reptilian features (observers of Teshact from Earth would call them a humanoid wolf-crocodile). Teshact are not known for their intelligence, though they do have battle cunning (especially their officers), and are able to execute complex military strategies and tactics. Just don't ask them to solve for Y, unless Y is how to eat their enemies after reducing them to bite-sized chunks.

 

 

Teschact Regulars:  Init +4; Atk Stingsword +3 melee (1d8+2; Sting) or Stingspear +3 melee (1d6+1; Sting) or Plasma Rifle +2 ranged (1d8+1; Stun); AC 20; HD 3d10; MV 30’; Act 1d20*;SP: All-around attack*, Han’uma and Dortich weaponry;  SV Fort +6,Ref +2, Will +4; AL L.

 

Teshact regulars are the 'meat' of the Vril armies. They fill the standard infantry, scouts, and beast-cavalry roles. Centurions cannot be intimidated and never need check morale.

 

If a centurion does not move in a round, it may attack all adjacent foes at -1 per foe attacked. If the centurion’s attack roll exceeds the opponent’s AC by 5, Han’uma (Sting) melee weapons inject a painful toxin (Fort DC 10+damage). On a failed save, the weapon does an additional 1d6 damage. If an attack by Vril plasma weaponry (Dortich) exceeds the opponent’s AC by 5, the opponent must make a Will save (DC 10+damage) or be knocked unconscious.

 

Teschact Scouts:  Init +6; Atk Stingblade +3 melee (1d6+1; Sting); Plasmagun +4 ranged (1d8+1; Stun); AC 16; HD 2d10; MV 30’; Act 1d20;SP: Han’uma and Dortich weaponry; Lightning Reflexes  SV Fort +2,Ref +6, Will +2; AL L.

 

Centurion scouts are more intelligent forms of Teschact trained to drive and pilot the Vril ground and hover vehicles. Typically, these Teschact are lightly armed and smaller versions of their Centurion cousins. Behind the controls of Vril vehicles, the scout’s lightning reflexes provide a +6 to Agility checks to pilot.

 

Vril Overseers

Vril overseers act as military officers, technicians, slave keepers and various mundane and 'middle class' tasks in Vril society. Overseers, called Dhoja in the Vril language, are gaunt, multi-armed humanoid creatures with bulbous insectoid heads. Their legs are double-jointed allowing them to drop onto four limbs, and still use their second set of arms to manipulate tools and weapons. Dhoja are incredibly intelligent, and prolific, but also complacent, thus though they make up the bulk of Vril society, they are content to be ruled, rather than to rule.

 

Some have opined that arachno-men are biological mutations of the Dhoja, though such talk is brutally repressed in Vril society.

 

Dhoja Slavetaker:  Init +2; Atk Plasmalance +2 melee (1d8+1; Stun) or 2 Stingswords +2 melee (1d6+1; Sting); Plasmalance +2 ranged (1d6+1; Stun); AC 14; HD 1d10; MV 30’; Act 1d20 or 1d16/1d16;SP: Han’uma and Dortich weaponry; Fear, Telepathy; SV Fort +2,Ref +2, Will +6; AL L.

 

Dhoja slavetakers are the whips of the Vril society, catching and managing the slave races, typically arachno-men.

 

Dhoja can communicate with any semi-intelligent creature via telepathy at a range of 100 yards. They use this ability to control their mounts (typically dringas) and to communicate between themselves and their charges. Using this ability, Dhoja can cause fear in its opponents (Will DC 16). This is typically used to cow captured slaves or potential slaves.

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